Duplicating products: Step five – create a starting recipe in percentages

DUPLICATING PRODUCTS IN SIX STEPS

1. Get the complete ingredient list.

2. Look at what each ingredient brings to the product.

3. Figure out what’s really important and what’s there for label appeal.

4. Figure out how much of each ingredient to use.

5. Create a starting recipe in percentages.

6. Make the recipe, then tweak it to get the skin feel and viscosity you want.

STEP FIVE: Create a starting recipe in percentages and try it.

Remember that this is only our starting point. For some products, I may have no idea what the skin feel or viscosity of this product might be as it’s something I’ve only seen on-line, so I’m trying to come up with a recipe that will work as a prototype so I can see if I’m on the right track. You’ll be lucky to come up with a duplicate the first time you try it, but making it will give you an idea of where to go next.

In this case, I know Noxzema Classic Clean is a very thick product that comes in a jar. So I know I want to make this really thick. The way to do that is to have some great thickeners, like stearic acid and cetyl alcohol, and less water. I think I’ll consider a 50% to 60% water amount for this product. It helps if we can find some sample recipes for a product like this. I found a few examples of what’s called a “cleansing cream” and Jen at Lotioncrafters shared her thoughts on what I could do here. These products are generally 50% to 60% water, so that’s where I’ll start.
This is one of the reasons I came up with my basic lotion recipes on the blog. It helps me to get a fix on where I could start and what I can do next.
Water: We consider this last. When I’ve finished adding all the other things, I’ll add enough for the recipe to total 100%. I’m looking to use about 60% total water phase, which would include the propylene glycol, TEA, Ultrez, and liquid Germall Plus as it includes all water soluble ingredients.
Stearic acid: We’re using 12% in the heated oil phase. 3% will interact with 1.5% triethanolamine in a 2:1 ratio to create triethanolamine stearate, our emulsifier. The other 9% will be a thickener and emollient.
Soybean oil: Let’s use 12% in the heated oil phase as an emollient. You could use another oil if you wish at the same amount.
Propylene glycol: This is a great humectant, and I’m thinking we could use it at 8% in the heated water phase. You could substitute glycerin here, but might be a tad stickier than you’d like.
Cetyl alcohol: Let’s add 8% in the heated oil phase to be our thickener and oil free emollient. It’ll also make the product slightly glidy-er and satiny, two things stearic acid doesn’t bring to the product.
Linseed oil/macadamia nut oil: I’m using 8% in the heated oil phase as it’s a great emollient and will offer a slightly less greasy feeling to the product.
Triethanolamine (TEA): I’m adding this to the heated water phase. I need to use 1.5% to work with the 3% stearic acid to make the emulsifier, and I need another 0.3% to neutralize the Ultrez 20 carbomer.
Carbomer: I’m adding 0.4% to the heated water phase, where it’ll be neutralized by the 0.3% TEA.
Menthol: 0.1% into the heated oil phase or 0.1% peppermint essential oil into the cool down phase.
Camphor: 0.1% in the cool down phase. This would translate to about
Eucalyptus: 0.1% in the cool down phase.
Limonene: 0.05% in the cool down phase.
If you don’t have a really accurate scale, I would encourage you to leave out the last four ingredients as I don’t want you to add too much. Or use 1/64 tsp measure for a 100 gram batch. I really encourage you to get a cute little scale if you want to make products that might be using a lot of essential oils or fancy facial product ingredients as they need to be measured at tiny amounts.
Preservative: I’m using 0.5% liquid Germall Plus in the cool down phase. You could also use Suttocide A at up to 0.5% in the cool down phase.
I have a total of about 65% water and water soluble ingredients here, which is a little more than I wanted, but it seems like a logical recipe, so I’ll try it to see what I think.
STOP FOR A MOMENT BEFORE YOU THINK OF MAKING THIS! I DON’T WANT TO SPOIL THE SURPRISE FOR YOU, BUT IF YOU MAKE THIS, YOU WILL END UP WITH A BALL OF LOTION, WHICH IS FAR LESS AWESOME THAN IT SOUNDS!

ATTEMPT #1: DUPLICATING NOXZEMA CLASSIC CLEAN

HEATED WATER PHASE48.75% distilled water

8% propylene glycol

0.4% Ultrez 20 (carbomer)

1.9% triethanolamine

HEATED OIL PHASE

12% stearic acid

12% soy bean oil

8% cetyl alcohol

8% hazelnut or macadamia nut oil

0.1% menthol crystals

COOL DOWN PHASE

0.5% liquid Germall Plus or Suttocide A

0.1% camphor essential oil

0.1% eucalyptus essential oil

0.05% d-Limonene

Note: If you don’t have a tiny scale, round up the distilled water to 60%.

1. Weigh the heated water phase ingredients – distilled water and propylene glycol – into a heatproof container, like a Pyrex jug. Disperse the Ultrez 20 on the water and let wet for 6 minutes. Then add the triethanolamine, and mix. Weigh the container and ingredients, and write the number down for later.

2. Put the water phase ingredients into a double boiler and heat until 70˚C.

3. Weigh the heated oil phase ingredients into a heatproof container, like a Pyrex jug, and heat until 70˚C.

4. When the two containers are at the same temperature, remove the water phase jug from the double boiler and weigh it. Add warm water until you compensate for the evaporated water, that is to say you’ve reached the number you wrote down in step one.

5. Pour the heated oil phase into the water phase – or the water phase into the oil phase – slowly, while mixing. Continue to mix until you reach 45˚C or lower.

6. Add the cool down phase to the container and mix for a few minutes.

7. Let come to room temperature to see the final viscosity.

What’s the end result? Join me tomorrow to see that and see how we can tweak the product to get more of what we want.

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